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Herald Chronicle, 2018 Leadership Franklin County—11

Bryan Boyd, HHS

W

hen looking at all the leaders of Franklin County, one could

note that they have their hands in many different facets.

They also tend to have a good pulse of their communi-

ties, looking for what needs to be done to improve and sustain an

area’s promising outlook.

Huntland student Bryan Boyd mimics this sentiment with a va-

riety of interests.

When he is not on the gridiron or baseball fields, he can be seen

hunting, fishing, attending Future-Farmers-of-America meetings or

washing cars.

Boyd will take all of that wide range of experiences to pursue be-

coming a mechanical engineer someday — a fitting choice for all that

he dabbles in.

The same can be said about journeying through Franklin County

on five separate trips that did not include repeat action.

Thanks to State Rep. David Alexander and his administrative as-

sistant, Kim Reasonover, the class got to listen to several prominent

Tennessee lawmakers that Boyd was impressed with.

Most residents don’t think a county like Franklin can have a far-

reaching impact into state government and beyond, but that is very

much the case for this county as the leadership class got to see first-

hand.

This influence impressed Boyd because of how well the county is

involved in the state government.

The influence does not just stretch out to government, it also ex-

tends out to the agriculture sector which is still the number one in-

dustry in Franklin County.

Boyd has always been very interested in the outdoors and loved

learning about how the county helps distribute goods all over the

world.

Boyd called his experience in the program interesting and, over-

all, a good time in the program.

Elizabeth Collins, FCHS

W

hen one searches the depths of the ocean, it can be thrilling, excit-

ing and scary because an explorer will never really know what they

will find.

Which is precisely why explorers love getting the chance to reach the un-

known because they just might find new things about the ocean they other-

wise would overlook.

That’s exactly what occurs for students in the Leadership program as they

comb through Franklin County’s vast amount of industries and leaders that

make the county what is today.

For future computer engineer and marine biologist Elizabeth Collins, she

really enjoyed the opportunity to see different places in the county that she

would not have been able to see otherwise.

Some of the vastness that was explored was going to see the Nissan and

Infiniti plants, Phoenix Boats and touring the prestigious University of the

South in Sewanee.

However for Collins, agriculture day was her favorite over the others due

to some of the unique experiences she underwent on those days.

“Agriculture Day was my favorite because I love nature, and going to the

cow farm was really fun because we got to milk the cows,” Collins said. “The

cotton gin tour was also awesome because I had never seen the behind-the-

scenes of that process before.”

Many of the days were spent with information being handed out by the

speakers at various sites along the Leadership tour schedule.

Collins’ overall thought about the whole experience is that it was infor-

mational, fun and educational.

The program provided an opportunity for students to see all of what

Franklin County has to offer, but at the same time, it provided students with

a chance to make connections with others in the class, an experience that

probably wouldn’t have happened without being involved in Leadership.

Collins said that having the adult and students together in class was great

because the students could get to know the adults who might be able to help

them with their future career plans. She added that residents should take

part in the program to meet new people and learn the history of the county

that they live in.

Collins did acknowledge that she did not know what to expect, but it

was an amazing experience, learning things about leadership and Franklin

County.

Bryan Boyd, left, with fellow Leadership student Blake

MacDonald